On Nov. 12, 2008, at a celebration held at London's New Wimbledon Theatre two days before Prince Charles's 60th birthday, Robin Williams delivered a nine-minute monologue on the 2008 presidential election and the end of President George W. Bush's administration.[1]  --  The appearance, in a show entitled "We Are Most Amused" that also featured John Cleese and Rowan Atkinson (Mr. Bean), was Williams's first stand-up stage appearance in Great Britain in 25 years.  --  Robin Williams is now 57 years old.  --  "Charles was just three when his mother became Queen, making him, as her eldest son, heir to the throne," Reuters reported on his birthday.[2]  --  "The Queen, now 82, is the oldest reigning monarch in the history of the nation and is still in good health.  Her mother lived to be 101."  --  A YouGov poll "found 42 percent of people [in the U.K.] were in favor of him succeeding the Queen, compared to 35 percent who thought the throne should skip a generation to Prince William, Charles's elder son.  --  When the same question was asked in 2005, only 31 percent backed Charles, while 42 percent preferred William, whose mother was the late Princess Diana." ...


This video, which is entitled "Les Misbarack," was produced more than two months ago and has remarkable production values.[1]  --  Andrew Sullivan commented:  "Whatever happens, the McCain campaign could never pull this off.  Patience, steel... triumph."  --  While it has been viewed more than a million times, it has never been more timely than on Nov. 3, 2008, as the most remarkable, the most disciplined, the most focused, the most historic, and — one more day may show — the most successful presidential campaign in modern American history draws to a close.  --  BACKGROUND:  For more on the original song ("One Day More") from the 1980 musical, see here....


For five minutes Gov. Sarah Palin thought she was talking to President Nicolas Sarkozy on Saturday as a Montreal comedian Marc-Antoine Audette pretended he was the French head of state.  --  "Audette, posing as Sarkozy, speaks in an exaggerated French accent and drops ample hints that the conversation is a joke.  But Palin seemingly does not pick up on them," AP reported Saturday.[1]  --  The entire conversation, in which Audette's voice sounds nothing like Sarkozy's, can be heard on YouTube.[2] ...