On Friday, the news service of Canada's largest newspaper publisher, CanWest Global Communications, was the first major mainstream media source to report that "Canada and the U.S. have signed an agreement that paves the way for the militaries from either nation to send troops across each other's borders during an emergency."[1]  --  "Neither the Canadian government nor the Canadian Forces announced the new agreement, which was signed Feb. 14 in Texas," David Pugliese reported.  --  "The U.S. military's Northern Command, however, publicized the agreement with a statement [see #5 below] outlining how its top officer, Gen. Gene Renuart, and Canadian Lt.-Gen. Marc Dumais, head of Canada Command, signed the plan, which allows the military from one nation to support the armed forces of the other nation during a civil emergency."  --  Pugliese noted that "The new agreement has been greeted with suspicion by the left wing in Canada and the right wing in the U.S."  --  But the right wing in Canada was exercised as well, as an article posted Monday on the Canada Free Press web site showed.  --  An article entitled "Welcome to the North American Army" asked in its lead paragraph:  "Will historians one day record that 'It happened on Valentine's Day' when chronicling the timetable of the North American Union (NAU)?"[2]  --  The American right-wing web site Death by a Thousand Cuts published a similar piece.[3]  --  Another called the agreement "treasonous."  --  Chuck Baldwin, the right-wing and (since 2000) anti-Bush Baptist pastor based in Pensacola, Florida, denounced the pact as done "at the behest of David Rockefeller and his cabal of moneychangers at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR)."  --  We have been unable to identify any significant U.S. media coverage of the agreement, with the exception of a short article in the Colorado Springs Gazette on Feb. 18.[4]  --  Colorado Springs, of course, is the locus of an extraordinary concentration of military institutions (the United States Air Force Academy, NORAD, Fort Carson, Peterson Air Force Base, and Schriever Air Force Base [formerly Falcon AFB]) and defense contractors (Northrop Grumman, Lockheed Martin, Boeing, ITT, L-3 Communciations, etc.)  --  The Feb. 14 news release from Northern Command, which calls the pact a "Civil Assistance Plan," is posted below.[5] ...

1.

CANADA, U.S. AGREE TO USE EACH OTHER'S TROOPS IN CIVIL EMERGENCIES
By David Pugliese

Canwest News Service
February 22, 2008

http://www.canada.com/components/print.aspx?id=403d90d6-7a61-41ac-8cef-902a1d14879d&k=14984
or
http://www.nationalpost.com/news/canada/story.html?id=327869

Canada and the U.S. have signed an agreement that paves the way for the militaries from either nation to send troops across each other's borders during an emergency, but some are questioning why the Harper government has kept silent on the deal.

Neither the Canadian government nor the Canadian Forces announced the new agreement, which was signed Feb. 14 in Texas.

The U.S. military's Northern Command, however, publicized the agreement with a statement outlining how its top officer, Gen. Gene Renuart, and Canadian Lt.-Gen. Marc Dumais, head of Canada Command, signed the plan, which allows the military from one nation to support the armed forces of the other nation during a civil emergency.

The new agreement has been greeted with suspicion by the left wing in Canada and the right wing in the U.S.

The left-leaning Council of Canadians, which is campaigning against what it calls the increasing integration of the U.S. and Canadian militaries, is raising concerns about the deal.

"It's kind of a trend when it comes to issues of Canada-U.S. relations and contentious issues like military integration. We see that this government is reluctant to disclose information to Canadians that is readily available on American and Mexican websites," said Stuart Trew, a researcher with the Council of Canadians.

Trew said there is potential for the agreement to militarize civilian responses to emergency incidents. He noted that work is also underway for the two nations to put in place a joint plan to protect common infrastructure such as roadways and oil pipelines.

"Are we going to see (U.S.) troops on our soil for minor potential threats to a pipeline or a road?" he asked.

Trew also noted the U.S. military does not allow its soldiers to operate under foreign command so there are questions about who controls American forces if they are requested for service in Canada. "We don't know the answers because the government doesn't want to even announce the plan," he said.

But Canada Command spokesman Commander David Scanlon said it will be up to civilian authorities in both countries on whether military assistance is requested or even used.

He said the agreement is "benign" and simply sets the stage for military-to-military co-operation if the governments approve.

"But there's no agreement to allow troops to come in," he said. "It facilitates planning and co-ordination between the two militaries. The 'allow' piece is entirely up to the two governments."

If U.S. forces were to come into Canada they would be under tactical control of the Canadian Forces but still under the command of the U.S. military, Scanlon added.

News of the deal, and the allegation it was kept secret in Canada, is already making the rounds on left-wing blogs and Internet sites as an example of the dangers of the growing integration between the two militaries.

On right-wing blogs in the U.S. it is being used as evidence of a plan for a "North American union" where foreign troops, not bound by U.S. laws, could be used by the American federal government to override local authorities.

"Co-operative militaries on Home Soil!" notes one website. "The next time your town has a 'national emergency,' don't be surprised if Canadian soldiers respond. And remember -- Canadian military aren't bound by posse comitatus."

Posse comitatus is a U.S. law that prohibits the use of federal troops from conducting law enforcement duties on domestic soil unless approved by Congress.

Scanlon said there was no intent to keep the agreement secret on the Canadian side of the border. He noted it will be reported on in the Canadian Forces newspaper next week and that publication will be put on the Internet.

Scanlon said the actual agreement hasn't been released to the public as that requires approval from both nations. That decision has not yet been taken, he added.

2.

Domestic civil emergencies

WELCOME TO THE NORTH AMERICAN ARMY
By Judi McLeod

Canada Free Press
February 25, 2008

http://canadafreepress.com/index.php/article/2040

Will historians one day record that “It happened on Valentine’s Day” when chronicling the timetable of the North American Union (NAU)?

With no warning, a significant military agreement was signed by the chief Armed Forces commanders of both the U.S.A. and Canada on Feb. 14. The agreement allows the armed forces from one nation to support the armed forces of the other nation during a domestic civil emergency.

And as Jerome R. Corsi writes of the range of domestic civil emergencies, in WorldNetDaily, “even one that does not involve a cross-border crisis.”

The Valentine’s Day pact got zero coverage in the mainstream media whose investigative reporters must have been out hunting down chocolate and posies.

Were it not for a USNORTHCOM photo that surfaced depicting a beaming U.S. air Force Gen. Gene Renuart, USNORTHCOM commander and Canadian Air Force Lt. Gen. Marc Dumais, commander of Canada Command, the public the media serve would have been left in the dark.

Perhaps the generals won’t get to tell North American Union-suspecting citizens that the NAU is the province of only the conspiracy theorist.

Paperwork always comes in handy when bureaucrats cry “Conspiracy Theory.”

Defined by its architects as a “Civil Assistance Plan,” the agreement was never submitted to Congress for approval.

“Nor did Congress pass any law or treaty specifically authorizing this military agreement to combine the operations of the armed forces of the United States and Canada in the event of a wide range of domestic civil disturbances ranging from violent storms, to heal epidemics, to civil riots or terrorist attacks.” (WorldNetDaily, Feb. 24, 2008).

Mind you, reporter David Pugliese, had the story published by CanWest News Service on Friday.

Imagine an agreement that paves the way for the militaries of the U.S. and Canada to cross each other’s borders to fight domestic emergencies not being announced by either the Harper government or the Canadian military.

“It’s kind of a trend when it comes to issues of Canada-U.S. relations and contentious issues like military integration,” Stuart Trew, a researcher with the Council of Canadians told the CanWest News Service. “We see that this government is reluctant to disclose information to Canadians that is readily available on American and Mexican websites.”

“This document is a unique, bilateral military plan to align our respective national military plans to respond quickly to the other nation’s requests for military support of civil authorities,” Renuart said in a statement published on the USNORTHCom website.

“The signing of this plan is an important symbol of the already strong working relationship between Canada Command and the U.S. Northern Command,” said Lt. Gen. Dumais.

“Our commands were created by our respective governments to respond to the defense and security challenges of the twenty-first century,” he stressed, “and we both realize that these and other challenges are best met through cooperation between friends.”

While Canadian citizens opened their homes to Americans stranded on September 11, 2001, there was no military aid sent to the U.S. from Canada, whose then Prime Minister Jean Chrétien remained silent.

In a program on the first anniversary of the deadly hijackings, Chrétien told CBC TV that a clear signal had been sent to all Western countries: do not abuse your strength or wealth.

“You cannot exercise your powers to the point of humiliation for the others,” Chrétien said. “And that is what the Western world -- not only the Americans, the Western world -- has to realize. Because they are human beings, too.”

Truth is the Chrétien crony Liberals haven’t gone away. They are merely waiting in the wings to bring down the Harper minority government.

The same Liberals who join the Canadian New Democrat Party (NDP) whose mantra is to bring the troops home from Afghanistan.

Some Liberal and NDP MPs continue to hold anti-American sentiments.

That’s a strange environment from which to forge a plan whose “challenges are best met through cooperation between friends,” Lieutenant General Dumais.

U.S. Northern Command was established on Oct. 1, 2002, as a military command tasked with anticipating and conducting homeland defense and civil support operations where U.S. armed forces are used in domestic emergencies.

Canada Command was established on Feb. 1, 2006, to focus on domestic operations and offer a single point of contact for all domestic and continental defense and securities partners.

Meanwhile, since the North American Union is a three-nation initiative, when will the Mexican Army be brought in during a domestic civil emergency?

3.

NORTH AMERICAN ARMY CREATED
By Mondoreb

** What Is Presidential Directive 51? **

Death by a Thousand Cuts
February 25, 2008

http://deathby1000papercuts.blogspot.com/2008/02/north-american-army-created.html

In a story that got almost no media attention, either in Canada, or the United States, the U.S. and Canada signed a military agreement that allowed the armed forces from one nation to cross the border and support the armed forces of the other nation during a domestic civil emergency -- even one that doesn't involve a cross-border crisis.

The agreement was not announced by the Harper government in Canada.

The move set up the beginnings of a North American Army. The agreement was not okayed by Congress.

From WorldNetDaily: "The agreement, defined as a Civil Assistance Plan, was not submitted to Congress for approval, nor did Congress pass any law or treaty specifically authorizing this military agreement to combine the operations of the armed forces of the United States and Canada in the event of a wide range of domestic civil disturbances ranging from violent storms, to health epidemics, to civil riots, or terrorist attacks.

"In Canada, the agreement paving the way for the militaries of the U.S. and Canada to cross each other's borders to fight domestic emergencies was not announced either by the Harper government or the Canadian military, prompting sharp protest.

"'It's kind of a trend when it comes to issues of Canada-U.S. relations and contentious issues like military integration,' Stuart Trew, a researcher with the Council of Canadians told the Canwest News Service. 'We see that this government is reluctant to disclose information to Canadians that is readily available on American and Mexican websites.'

"The military Civil Assistance Plan can be seen as a further incremental step being taken toward creating a North American armed forces available to be deployed in domestic North American emergency situation."

The move is sure to add fuel to the fire of those critics who warn of American armed forces involved in domestic matters.

When it was signed, the American by U.S. Air Force Gen. Gene Renuart, commander of NORAD and U.S. Northern Command, or USNORTHCOM, and by Canadian Air Force Lt. Gen. Marc Dumais, commander of Canada Command, it was held up as a good thing for forest fires and hurricanes: "'This document is a unique, bilateral military plan to align our respective national military plans to respond quickly to the other nation's requests for military support of civil authorities,' Renuart said in a statement published on the USNORTHCOM website.

"In discussing the new bilateral Civil Assistance Plan established by USNORTHCOM and Canada Command, Renuart stressed, 'Unity of effort during bilateral support for civil support operations such as floods, forest fires, hurricanes, earthquakes, and effects of a terrorist attack, in order to save lives, prevent human suffering, and mitigate damage to property, is of the highest importance, and we need to be able to have forces that are flexible and adaptive to support rapid decision-making in a collaborative environment.'

"Lt. Gen. Dumais seconded Renuart's sentiments, stating, 'The signing of this plan is an important symbol of the already strong working relationship between Canada Command and U.S. Northern Command.'

"'Our commands were created by our respective governments to respond to the defense and security challenges of the twenty-first century,' he stressed, 'and we both realize that these and other challenges are best met through cooperation between friends.'

In Nov. 2007, WND published a six-part exclusive series, detailing WND's on-site presence during the NORAD-USNORTHCOM Vigilant Shield 2008, an exercise which involved Canada Command as a participant.

In an exclusive interview with WND during Vigilant Shield 2008, Gen. Renuart affirmed USNORTHCOM would deploy U.S. troops on U.S. soil should the president declare a domestic emergency in which the Department of Defense ordered USNORTHCOM involvement.

In May 2007, WND reported, President Bush, on his own authority, signed National Security Presidential Directive 51, also known as Homeland Security Presidential Directive 20, authorizing the president to declare a national emergency and take over all functions of federal, state, local, territorial, and tribal governments, without necessarily obtaining the approval of Congress to do so.

It is this last part that is particularly troubling.

In what domestic emergency might it be necessary to deploy troops in the USA without getting Congressional consent?

And why hasn't this received more publicity.

We're all for fighting the War on Terror, at home and abroad.

But, we're also for safeguarding civil liberties at home.

And who knows who the next president shall be?

And now a new North American army.

We're looking into the agreement and Directive 51 and will have more to say on both later.

We're not a conspiracy theorist, by any means, but we have to admit, our first thoughts agree with the way one person put it.

"Kinda scary."

4.

U.S., CANADA TO WORK TOGETHER IN CRISES

Colorado Springs Gazette
February 18, 2008

http://www.gazette.com/articles/canada_33274___article.html/military_plan.html

The United States and Canada have inked an agreement to help one another during civil emergencies.

Air Force Gen. Gene Renuart, commander of North American Aerospace Defense Command and Northern Command based at Peterson Air Force Base, and Canadian Air Force Lt. Gen. Marc Dumais, Canada Command commander, signed the pact last week.

The Civil Assistance Plan allows the military from one nation to support the armed forces of the other nation.

“This document is a unique, bilateral military plan to align our respective national military plans to respond quickly to the other nation’s requests for military support of civil authorities,” Renuart said in a statement.

The agreement allows mutual assistance during floods, forest fires, hurricanes, earthquakes and effects of a terrorist attack.

Dumais said the plan underscores the two nations’ existing working relationship, evidenced by the joint command NORAD.

The plan recognizes the role of each nation’s lead federal agency for emergency preparedness. For the United States, it’s the Department of Homeland Security, and in Canada, Public Safety Canada.

The plan facilitates the military-to-military support of civil authorities after government authorities agree on a response.

NorthCom was established on Oct. 1, 2002. Canada Command was set up on Feb. 1, 2006.

5.

News

U.S. NORTHERN COMMAND, CANADA COMMAND ESTABLISH NEW BILATERAL CIVIL ASSISTANCE PLAN

U.S. Northern Command
February 14, 2008

http://www.northcom.mil/news/2008/021408.html

[PHOTO CAPTION: U.S. Air Force Gen. Gene Renuart, left, commander of North American Aerospace Defense Command and U.S. Northern Command, and Canadian Air Force Lt.-Gen. Marc Dumais, commander of Canada Command, signed a Civil Assistance Plan that allows the military from one nation to support the armed forces of the other nation during a civil emergency. The signing took place at U.S. Army North headquarters, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, Feb. 14, 2008.]

SAN ANTONIO, Texas -- U.S. Air Force Gen. Gene Renuart, commander of North American Aerospace Defense Command and U.S. Northern Command, and Canadian Air Force Lt.-Gen. Marc Dumais, commander of Canada Command, have signed a Civil Assistance Plan that allows the military from one nation to support the armed forces of the other nation during a civil emergency.

“This document is a unique, bilateral military plan to align our respective national military plans to respond quickly to the other nation's requests for military support of civil authorities,” Renuart said. “Unity of effort during bilateral support for civil support operations such as floods, forest fires, hurricanes, earthquakes, and effects of a terrorist attack, in order to save lives, prevent human suffering, and mitigate damage to property, is of the highest importance, and we need to be able to have forces that are flexible and adaptive to support rapid decision-making in a collaborative environment.”

“The signing of this plan is an important symbol of the already strong working relationship between Canada Command and U.S. Northern Command,” Dumais said. “Our commands were created by our respective governments to respond to the defense and security challenges of the twenty-first century, and we both realize that these and other challenges are best met through cooperation between friends.”

The plan recognizes the role of each nation's lead federal agency for emergency preparedness, which in the United States is the Department of Homeland Security and in Canada is Public Safety Canada. The plan facilitates the military-to-military support of civil authorities once government authorities have agreed on an appropriate response.

U.S. Northern Command was established on Oct. 1, 2002, to anticipate and conduct homeland defense and civil support operations within the assigned area of responsibility to defend, protect, and secure the United States and its interests.

Similarly, Canada Command was established on Feb. 1, 2006, to focus on domestic operations and to offer a single point of contact for all domestic and continental defense and security partners.

The two domestic commands established strong bilateral ties well before the signing of the Civil Assistance Plan. The two commanders and their staffs meet regularly, collaborate on contingency planning and participate in related annual exercises.