On Jan. 9, military veterans ("only MALES") were invited to apply for twenty openings for part- to full-time employment (1-40 hours a week) at $14.33 an hour to be "Role Players" in "military training exercises conducted on and in the vicinity of Fort Lewis."[1]  --  The role to be portrayed:  "that of Detainees."  --  "Operations are staged day and night, and in all weather conditions."  --  The employer was identified only as a "government contractor."  --  A "non-disclosure statement" signed "prior to initial entry to the work site" is among the "minimum job requirements," along with "a DD Form 214 with a [sic] honorable discharge," "excellent communication skills."  --  All interested candidates are invited to "apply in person at Clover Park Technical College starting "at 10:00 a.m. — SHARP!!"  --  The job location is "FORT LEWIS" and the ad specifies:  "You DO NOT need to go to any other WorkSource office to apply for this job."  --  (A DD Form 214 is a Certificate of Release or Discharge From Active Duty, enabling an individual to participate in VA, state, and federal programs.)  --  According to a June 2005 New York Times piece, such training began at Fort Lewis "in two Korean War-era wooden warehouses" with "more than 50 wood-frame cells with chain-link fencing that try to mirror the conditions at Guantánamo Bay" in November 2004, when detainees were played by "soldiers dressed and trained to play the role of belligerent prisoners"[2]; the job is now being outsourced to veterans working for a private contractor.  --  But on Dec. 24, Raw Story called attention to recent news that the military may have other things in mind:  "The Pentagon is looking for experts in psychology, religion, and education to aid its efforts on 'the battlefield of the mind,' as the military struggles to reform roughly 25,000 Iraqi prisoners in custody across the country the U.S. invaded nearly five years ago.  --  The Washington Post's Walter Pincus reports on a proposal from the Joint Contracting Command for a team of private contractors including 'teachers, religious, and behavioral science counselors' who will be charged with running a program that 'effectively reintegrates detainees, particularly those disposed to violent, radical ideology.'"[3]  --  In the Post piece, also published on Dec. 24, Walter Pincus described a disturbingly Orwellian mind-control program for which bids closed on Jan. 8.[4]  --  Walter Pincus described how "the Joint Contracting Command is seeking a team of professionals, including 'teachers, religious, and behavioral science counselors,' who will 'execute a program that effectively reintegrates [into Iraqi society] detainees, particularly those disposed to violent, radical ideology through education and counseling,' according to the statement of work.  --  Part of the program will involve small detainee groups, possibly led by an Iraqi cleric and a behavioral scientist, 'undergoing enlightenment, deprogramming, and de-radicalization sessions' for six weeks.  --  At a news conference this month, Stone said he was segregating extremists from more moderate Iraqis being brought in by U.S. troops as potential security threats.  Stone has already started voluntary educational and vocational classes for prisoners, plus one on religion with the help of 43 imams.  He also instituted a release program for those no longer deemed security risks." ...

1.

Job detail

ROLE PLAYER -- MILITARY TRAINING SIMULATIONS

Original source: fortress.wa.gov

WorkSource Job Number: WA1815314
Listed By: WORKSOURCE BUSINESS CONNECTION on Jan 9, 2008
Last Modified on: Jan 9, 2008

Description
Job Description
Government contractor is seeking "Role Players" to participate in military training exercises conducted on and in the vicinity of Fort Lewis. Role portrayal will be that of Detainees. Operations are staged day and night, and in all weather conditions.

Hours / Days / Schedule:
All Shifts: Hours vary, Sun-Sat. This is part- to full-time, on-call work, and total weekly hours may vary. Shift times will vary according to military requirements & training scenarios, and may be scheduled any day of the week, including weekends.

Minimum Job Requirements:
* Based on the specific duties of this position, only MALES may apply for this job (DOL-approved Bona Fide Occupational Qualification);
* MUST be a DD Form 214 holder with a honorable discharge;
* Possess excellent communications skills;
* Pass pre-employment drug screening, and thorough criminal background check (no felonies);
* Valid Washington State drivers' license or picture ID
* Upon selection, sign a non-disclosure statement prior to initial entry to the work site;
* Reliable telephone and transportation (travel on military base requires valid registration & current proof of insurance).

Wages / Benefits:
Pay is $14.33 / hour.

HOW TO APPLY:
The employer asks all interested candidates to apply in person at:

WorkSource Business Connection
4650 Steilacoom Blvd SW, Bldg 19
Clover Park Technical College Campus
Lakewood, WA 98499
(253-583-8800)

on Tuesday, January 29, 2008, starting at 10:00 a.m. -- SHARP!!. Bring Valid Washington drivers' license, DD214(if applicable), Social Security card, and a Voided Check(for direct deposit).

NOTE: You DO NOT need to go to any other WorkSource office to apply for this job. Simply follow the direction in the narrative above.
Job Location(s)
Location: City: State: Zip Code: Number of Openings: Pierce FORT LEWIS WA 98433 20
Other Information

Minimum Pay: $14.33
Duration: Part Time, 4-150 Days
Maximum Pay: $14.33 Minimum hours per week: 1
Pay Unit: Hour Maximum hours per week: 40
Educational Requirement: No Educational Requirement Entry Level: Yes
Skills Desired: Communication, team player, prior military service

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How to Request a Referral
To Request a Referral for this job order, you must contact an Employment Representative at the WorkSource Office shown below for application instructions.

NOTE: You must be logged in to use the Prospects Folder.

Contact the WorkSource Office at:

WORKSOURCE BUSINESS CONNECTION
Phone: (253) 583-8804
Or send Your Résumé to:

WORKSOURCE BUSINESS CONNECTION
LAKEWOOD, WA 98409
Fax: (253) 583-8805

If sending your resume, please include the WorkSource Job Number for this job along with your name and contact information. Also, please indicate if you served in the U.S. Military Service. Including your Social Security Number is optional but will help us do a better job managing your application.

2.

U.S.

MILITARY GUARDS IN TRAINING FACE THEIR FIRST RIOT AT HOME
By Eric Schmitt

New York Times
June 5, 2005

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9404E3DC1538F936A35755C0A9639C8B63

For a tense 15 minutes, the mock riot at the simulated detention center here seemed almost too real to be a drill for two dozen Air Force security personnel who are headed to Iraq soon.

Shortly before noon on a recent day, a group of soldiers acting as insurgent prisoners pelted the Air Force prison patrol in a scripted attack that called for injuring one airman -- though the mock detainees threw tennis balls, not rocks. To quell the uprising, another guard feigned firing a shotgun at the mob and wounding a detainee.

The shooting incensed the 50 prisoners behind the double concertina wire. Some surged toward the front of the camp, shouting angrily. Others banged rocks against metal fence stakes. Amid the deafening clamor, the chief guard and a detainee leader, speaking through an interpreter, used the guise of a shift rotation to move the guard who fired the shots to a different job, defusing the crisis.

In response to the prisoner-abuse scandal at Abu Ghraib, the Army is taking lessons learned from combat zones to train its security forces and those from the Navy and Air Force for guard duty at American detention centers in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. Using the detention mock-up here, which cost $165,000, military instructors and role-playing detainees force the guards to confront situations they would see in places like Abu Ghraib, including riots and prison breaks.

For the nearly 400 Air Force security personnel training at Fort Lewis, the goal of the 10-day program is to give the guards a taste of the conflicting demands and tensions they will probably face when they deploy in June to Camp Bucca, an American military prison in southern Iraq. The detainees -- soldiers dressed and trained to play the role of belligerent prisoners -- have one goal: to make life for the guards as stressful as possible.

"I had to worry about five things at once," said Tech. Sgt. Matt Larson, 35, a 17-year Air Force security force veteran in a Kevlar helmet and body armor, after negotiating the peaceful end to the scripted turmoil. "It forces you to learn a lot quickly."

Army officials say the instruction, which started here in November and has since trained about 1,500 military security force personnel, is a pivotal piece in a broader series of steps the service has taken in recent months to improve the way the military trains for and conducts worldwide detention operations.

Senior officers say the training here and at a longer-running program at Fort Dix, N.J., focuses on humanely caring for and controlling prisoners, but also seeks to simulate the most stressful or potentially dangerous parts of the job. The role-playing detainees, who are allowed to grow beards and long hair, have broad leeway to confuse, confound, and unnerve security forces. They scream at guards, ignore their orders, and throw rocks (tennis balls), or feces (chocolate pudding) at them.

Observers walk the compound to ensure the role-playing does not get out of hand.

"If mistakes are to be made, we want them to make them here, not when they're forward deployed," said Col. Don A. Phillips, commander of the Fourth Brigade, 91st Division, which conducts the training. "They can't make them there."

Some human rights groups offer only tepid praise for the program, saying they are not convinced that the classes will overcome what they say is a flawed detention policy.

"Of course it's good for the Army to be training potential guards, but what matters is the nature of the training," said Kenneth Roth, the executive director of Human Rights Watch in New York.

The training takes place on this Army post south of Seattle in two Korean War-era wooden warehouses. Inside the buildings, there are more than 50 wood-frame cells with chain-link fencing that try to mirror the conditions at Guantánamo Bay.

In light of the military's recent admission that guards or interrogators at Guantánamo Bay mishandled the Koran, instructors are re-emphasizing rules that they say have long been in place. Guards are taught not to touch the Koran unless absolutely necessary, and then only with sterile gloves. Cotton surgical masks, which the soldiers call Koran hammocks, are suspended from the fencing to keep the Koran off the floor.

"Have we changed the training for dealing with the Koran? No," said Lt. Col. Warren M. Perry, who oversees the training program here. "Is it more on everyone's minds? Yes."

To simulate the detention centers in Iraq, guards and detainees operate in an outdoor compound next to the warehouses that is roughly 200 feet square and surrounded by concertina wire and guard towers. Three tents provide detainees shelter from the 90-degree day. Still, that is a far cry from the 125-degree days and nearly 6,500 detainees the guards will face when they arrive at Camp Bucca, near Basra.

In the first eight training days, security forces take courses in cultural awareness, self-defense (only guards outside the wire are armed) and proper procedures for feeding thousands of detainees. Guards then take a two-day final exam in which they run the prison in four-hour shifts as they might in Iraq. The exam's outcomes depend largely on how the guards react to challenges and to the detainees' improvisations.

"This gives us a lot of worst-case scenarios, and we can work them out," said Master Sgt. Daniel Kenney, an 18-year Air Force veteran.

Air Force security personnel, who are helping to fill the void left by a shortage of Army military police, say the training here gives them a head start on mastering detention procedures.

"When we get there, we've shaved down the learning curve," said Senior Master Sgt. Mark Myers, 35, an adviser who recently returned from a four-month tour at Camp Bucca.

Instructors review the final exercises; each guard is graded separately. Abu Ghraib is never far from trainers' minds. Of the 1,500 personnel sent here for training, about a dozen have flunked and been reassigned, Colonel Perry said.

"I can't say if I'd have weeded out a Charles Graner," said Colonel Perry, referring to the soldier who investigators say was the ringleader of abuse at Abu Ghraib. "But I watch for that every day."

Correction: June 7, 2005, Tuesday -- An article on Sunday about the use of training exercises at Fort Lewis, Wash., to help military personnel confront situations they might encounter while guarding detainees in places like Abu Ghraib gave incorrect dimensions in some copies for an outdoor compound used for the exercises. It is 200 feet square, not yards square.

Correction: June 8, 2005, Wednesday -- An article on Sunday about training exercises at Fort Lewis, Wash., that help troops confront situations they might encounter while guarding detainees in places like Abu Ghraib gave incorrect dimensions in some copies for an outdoor compound used at the base. Because of an editing error, a correction in this space yesterday also misstated the size. The compound is 200 feet square -- not 200 square feet or 200 yards square.

3.

NEXT JOB FOR CONTRACTORS IN IRAQ: 'DEPROGRAMMING' DETAINEES

Raw Story
December 24, 2007

http://rawstory.com/news/2007/Next_job_for_contractors_in_Iraq_1224.html

The Pentagon is looking for experts in psychology, religion, and education to aid its efforts on "the battlefield of the mind," as the military struggles to reform roughly 25,000 Iraqi prisoners in custody across the country the U.S. invaded nearly five years ago.

The Washington Post's Walter Pincus reports on a proposal from the Joint Contracting Command for a team of private contractors including "teachers, religious, and behavioral science counselors" who will be charged with running a program that "effectively reintegrates detainees, particularly those disposed to violent, radical ideology."

The program will cost the Pentagon between $5 million and $210 million, Pincus reports.

"Part of the program will involve small detainee groups, possibly led by an Iraqi cleric and a behavioral scientist, 'undergoing enlightenment, deprogramming and de-radicalization sessions' for six weeks," Pincus reports.

Marine Maj. Gen. Douglas M. Stone oversees the Iraqi prison population. He announced last month that he is segregating extremists from the rest of Iraqi prisoners captured by U.S. troops, and he has started voluntary educational, training, and religion programs for detainees, Pincus reports.

Now the general is calling for backup from the private sector. The proposal he put out for bid earlier this month looks to create a private group of Americans, Iraqis and other foreigners to run and expand the program he's created.

"The team is to provide reports and advice to Stone's aides about 'relevant ideological, religious, cultural, and education conditions of adult and juvenile detainees,' along with 'comprehensive individual assessments' that would 'enable prudent decision-making on release or continued detention of detainees,'" according to Pincus. "One stated goal for the program is creating 'a refined program of instruction' that would be something the Iraqi government could 'adopt and implement within its detention facilities.'"

4.

Politics

In the loop

'DEPROGRAMMING' IRAQI DETAINEES
By Walter Pincus

Washington Post
December 24, 2007
Page A13

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/12/23/AR2007122301598.html

[GRAPHIC]

Marine Maj. Gen. Douglas M. Stone, the commanding general in charge of detainee operations in Iraq, is seeking reinforcements from a contractor as he continues to maneuver on what he has called "the battlefield of the mind" and win over the roughly 25,000 Iraqi prisoners under his control.

In a proposal put out for bid Dec. 15, the Joint Contracting Command is seeking a team of professionals, including "teachers, religious, and behavioral science counselors," who will "execute a program that effectively reintegrates [into Iraqi society] detainees, particularly those disposed to violent, radical ideology through education and counseling," according to the statement of work.

Part of the program will involve small detainee groups, possibly led by an Iraqi cleric and a behavioral scientist, "undergoing enlightenment, deprogramming, and de-radicalization sessions" for six weeks.

At a news conference this month, Stone said he was segregating extremists from more moderate Iraqis being brought in by U.S. troops as potential security threats. Stone has already started voluntary educational and vocational classes for prisoners, plus one on religion with the help of 43 imams. He also instituted a release program for those no longer deemed security risks; it involves signing an oath not to take up arms against coalition forces.

Now, the general is seeking a contractor that will pull together a private group, made up of Americans, third-country nationals, and Iraqis, "to provide the management, professional skills, curriculum, and evaluation necessary" to take over this operational model.

The team, according to the proposal, must be led by an American with 10 years of experience in leadership and management, and with a security clearance at the "secret" level. It is strongly desirable for this person to have worked with Iraqis or third-country nationals and have five years of experience analyzing Middle Eastern religions, politics, and culture. A master's degree in psychology or behavioral science is also desired.

The No. 2 in the group is to be a "lead analyst" who must also be a U.S. citizen, have a secret-level clearance, and have management experience. This person must also have five years of background in intelligence gathering and interrogation.

The third person in the leadership team, who could be an Iraqi cleric or a third-country national, must have formal religious education in Islamic jurisprudence and the Koran. This person should be fluent in Iraqi Arabic dialect and have a working knowledge of English.

This person will be the lead trainer/counselor for the deprogramming and de-radicalization efforts. Assisting will be a "psychological enlightenment" specialist who must have a master's degree in behavioral science, speak and read Iraqi Arabic, and have five years of experience related to Middle Eastern radical ideologies. This person must also interview "radicalized detainees to collect information about their motivations and pathways to radicalization" in order to "identify openings for change."

Other team members will include a "juvenile psychological enlightenment" specialist with at least a master's in behavioral science who has knowledge of Iraqi Arabic. Also included will be an Iraqi social worker, an Iraqi cleric counselor and six teaching experts -- one to be a supervisor, another to be a "bilingual bicultural advisor" and others to be experienced in art, music, and computers.

The team is to provide reports and advice to Stone's aides about "relevant ideological, religious, cultural, and education conditions of adult and juvenile detainees," along with "comprehensive individual assessments" that would "enable prudent decision-making on release or continued detention of detainees." One stated goal for the program is creating "a refined program of instruction" that would be something the Iraqi government could "adopt and implement within its detention facilities."

Bids for the three-year program must be submitted by Jan. 8. The contracting agency has capped the cost at $210 million, with a minimum offer of $5 million.

--National security and intelligence reporter Walter Pincus pores over the speeches, reports, transcripts and other documents that flood Washington and every week uncovers the fine print that rarely makes headlines -- but should. If you have any items that fit the bill, please send them tohttp://This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..