In the July 19 London Review of Books, Jeremy Harding used the publication of Chase Madar's The Passion of Bradley Manning as an occasion to review Manning's case.  --  "The dismaying aspect of the story, Madar insists, is that no one leaked sooner:  American service personnel and government officials in their tens of thousands had access to the war logs and diplomatic cables."[1]  --  Harding's opening gambit is to relay rumors about Julian Assange's situation in the Ecuadorean embassy in London....

Sunday's New York Times Book Review concluded with a retrospective essay about her friend Dmitri Nabokov, who died in February, by Lila Azam Zanganeh, an Iranian born in Paris whose first book, The Enchanter: Nabokov and Happiness, about Vladimir Nabokof, was published last year by Norton.[1]  --  Zanganeh now lives in New York, and was the recipient of the 2011 Roger Shattuck Prize for Criticism....

Le Mourre is a vast encyclopedic dictionary of history drafted by a single man, Michel Mourre.  --  Mourre devoted the last decades of a brief reclusive life to the drafting of reference works that are perhaps unique in the 20th century for their solitary erudition.  --  Little-known in the English-speaking world, le Mourre, as the work has popularly come to be known, was first published in France in 1978, several months after the author's death at the age of 49.  --  It has gained a certain reputation as a monument of erudition, and has been kept up to date in several subsequent editions.  --  The 1996 French edition runs to 5,884 pages, one quarter of one of which summarizes the history of the northern Syrian city of Aleppo, translated below.[1]  --  Aleppo is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world.  --  Mourre's imperturbable impassivity and blasé attitude of nil admirari will not be attractive to many readers, but for others the sober virtues of his prose will have an appeal of their own....