United for Peace of Pierce County, WA - We nonviolently oppose the reliance on unilateral military actions rather than cooperative diplomacy.

ANALYSIS: NY Times admits (sort of) to warmongering on Syria

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Robert Parry pointed out on Monday that the Sunday New York Times published what he called a "grudging admission" that the vector analysis it used in a front-page story on Sept. 17 in order to pin blame for the Aug. 21, 2013, sarin gas attack on the Syrian government.[1]  --  But the admission of gulit by the Times was only implicit, and it was buried in the eighteenth paragraph of a story published under the fold on page 8.  --  President Obama asserted before the United Nations that "It’s an insult to human reason -- and to the legitimacy of this institution -- to suggest that anyone other than the regime carried out this attack," but it is in fact still uncertain who was responsible for the attack.  --  Yet in early September the U.S. was on the verge of going to war based on the Syrian government's alleged culpability.  --  The buried New York Times article that asserts, ever so discreetly, that new evidence "raised questions about the American government’s claims about the locations of launching points, and the technical intelligence behind them," is posted below.[2] ...

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NEWS: Network access cut to Anbar, 'on verge of all-out rebellion'

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On Monday the Financial Times of London reported that "Iraq’s volatile western region was on the verge of all-out rebellion against the central government" following the arrest over the weekend of a prominent legislator and the violent, lethal suppression of a peaceful protest in Ramadi.[1]  --  Reuters reported that the camp broken up "has been an irritant to Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki's Shi'ite Muslim-led government since Sunni protesters set it up a year ago to demonstrate against what they see as marginalization of their sect."[2]  --  The New York Times put the number dead at "[a]t least 17" and reported that "In scenes reminiscent of 2005, when Anbar was under the control of militants, tribal fighters in Ramadi deployed two tanks and seven Humvees they had seized from the military."[3]  --  "Police officials, speaking on the condition of anonymity, said that security forces had pulled out of Falluja and Ramadi and were shelling the areas where the militants were gathered," Yasir Ghazi said.  --  "The forces cut off communications networks and Internet access across Anbar Province."  --  The Wall Street Journal reported that the attack on the protest camp came despite "a deal reached Sunday between the camps' residents and Mr. Maliki's minister of defense" which would have traded dismantlement of the camp for the release of Sunni Parliament member Ahmed al-Alwani.[4] ...

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NEWS: Afghanistan war most unpopular in US history

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A recent CNN poll of adults in the United States indicates that "the country's longest military conflict arguably its most unpopular one as well."[1]  --  Only 17% support the war, which is opposed by 82%, up from 46% five years ago.  --  "Some 2,300 U.S. troops have been killed in Afghanistan since the war began in the autumn of 2001.  --  The U.S. is quickly drawing down its forces in Afghanistan.  --  If a bilateral security agreement that would keep up to 10,000 U.S. troops in Afghanistan after the end of 2014 isn't signed in the near future, the U.S. could withdrawal all forces from Afghanistan at the end of next year."  --  Luke Johnson, writing on the Huffington Post, noted that "U.S. efforts to impose an ultimatum to sign by the end of this year have failed."[2]  --  Although levels of support for the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan approached 90% in 2001, 57% of Americans now think that "it was the 'wrong thing to do' to invade," according to an AP poll conducted this month.  --  BACKGROUND:  --  Wikipedia has an extensive article on the evolution of international public opinion on the war in Afghanistan....

Last Updated on Monday, 30 December 2013 22:34 Read more...
 

ANALYSIS: Rise of ISIS changed equation in Syria

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The Mideast correspondent of The Economist wrote Friday in a blog posting on the New York Review of Books website that it is the rise in Syria of ISIS, an organization "[l]inked to al-Qaeda" (though not acknowledging Ayman Zawahiri's authority) that has "forced the U.S. government and its European allies to rethink their strategy of intermittent support to the moderate opposition and rhetoric calling for the ouster of . . . Bashar al-Assad."[1]  --  The rise of the Islamic State of Iraq and Greater Syria, an "international" and "extremist" 7,000-fighter group that originated in Iraq and that is also known as Da'ash, has occurred with remarkable rapidity, said Sarah Birke.  --  The group has extended its territorial control of much of northern Syria....

Last Updated on Saturday, 28 December 2013 15:11 Read more...
 

BACKGROUND: Welcome to NSA's world of 'general warrants and always-on surveillance'

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It has been difficult over the past seven months to follow the spate of revelations, sometimes highly technical, about the activities of the National Security State that we owe to Edward Snowden's selfless act of whistleblowing.  --  On Thursday, the Electronic Frontier Foundation provided a useful review of some of them.[1]  --  COMMENT:  Despite the considerable reaction to the revelations about the NSA, what is most striking, as the nation teeters on the brink of fascism, is how blind Americans have become to the ideas in the mind of James Madison in 1789 as he prepared what would become, in 1791, the Bill of Rights.  --  Among them:  "If tyranny and oppression come to this land it will be in the guise of fighting a foreign enemy."  --  And:  "The means of defence against foreign danger have been always the instruments of tyranny at home."  --  And:  "No nation could preserve its freedom in the midst of continual warfare."  --  And:  "All men having power ought to be distrusted to a certain degree."  --  And:  "I believe there are more instances of the abridgement of the freedom of the people by gradual and silent encroachments by those in power than by violent and sudden usurpations."  --  As examples of this blindness, consider two letters the New York Times published Friday dismissing concerns about NSA surveillance.  --  (1) The writer of the first, who lives in St. George, Utah, said the scandal "is not the mass violation of our privacy that the news media claims."  --  One wonders why the Times even considered publishing this manifestly false statement, which, by the way, came from the community with the nation's "fastest white population growth" [see Rich Benjamin, Searching for Whitopia (Hyperion, 2009), Ch. 1, pp. 17-18], located in the heart of "Utah's Dixie."  --  (2) The writer of the second, who lives in Boca Grande, Florida, told the Times that he's "not sure what we gain by tying N.S.A.'s data collection in knots."  --  As far as he's concerned we can forget the Constitution altogether:  "The government should have the tools it believes that it needs to protect the nation."  --  Could it be that the writer of this letter, who lives in a community known for its affluent social community and high income demographic, is mostly concerned about protecting not the nation but his investments?  --  La question, as the French say, est posée....

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NEWS: US rushing Hellfire missiles and ScanEagle drones to Iraq

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Late on Christmas Day the New York Times reported that "The United States is quietly rushing dozens of Hellfire missiles and low-tech surveillance drones to Iraq to help government forces combat an explosion of violence by a Qaeda-backed insurgency that is gaining territory in both western Iraq and neighboring Syria."[1]  --  This year has seen a surge of violence as "Al Qaeda’s regional affiliate, the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, has become a potent force in northern and western Iraq," Michael Gordon and Eric Schmitt said.  --  COMMENT:  The Times reporters were admirably discreet in downplaying their intimation that the introduction of American Predator drones (depicted affectionately as more grown-up "cousins" of the ScanEagle reconnaissance drones that have been sent to Iraq) may not be far off.  --   And they buried in an aside the fact that "Iraq is buying" the new weapons, indicating that the U.S. has turned the Iraq disaster into a source of revenue.  --  It is of note that among those pushing the introduction of armed drones is an "expert on Iraqi security" at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, which Mearsheimer and Walt have described as "part of the core" of the Israel lobby....

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ANALYSIS: Evidentiary exclusions of Espionage Act would doom Snowden if he returned to US for trial

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The representatives of the U.S. national security state demonstrate their bad faith when they say, as they often do and as National Security Advisor Susan Rice did on Sunday, that "We believe [Edward Snowden] should come back, he should be sent back, and he should have his day in court."  --  That this claim is disingenuous was explained on Monday on the Freedom of the Press Foundation website by Trevor Timm.[1]  --  The reason, in brief:  --  Because the administration has taken to prosecuting whistleblowers under the Espionage Act, and "there is no public interest exception to the Espionage Act.  --  Prosecutors in recent cases have convinced courts that the intent of the leaker, the value of leaks to the public, and the lack of harm caused by the leaks are irrelevant—and are therefore inadmissible in court."  --  As a result, Snowden would "not be able to tell the jury that his intent was to inform the American public about the government's secret interpretations of laws used to justify spying on millions of citizens without their knowledge, as opposed to selling secrets to hostile countries for their advantage."  --  And this despite the fact that a federal judge recently ruled that the practices revealed and denounced by Snowden are massive violations of the Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.  --  COMMENT:  To call "justice" a trial under the Espionage Act, rigged to prevent an effect defense, as Susan Rice did on the "60 Minutes" interview broadcast on Dec. 22, is like calling a papal bull "science."  --  What does it all mean?  --  We see three possibilities.  --  (1) The U.S. Constitution is no longer the supreme law of the land" (despite Article VI's declaration that "This Constitution . . . shall be the supreme Law of the Land; and the Judges in every State shall be bound thereby").  --  Or (2) the judges who have been public interest defenses under the Espionage Act have been betraying their oath of office that the second paragraph Article VI requires them to make."  --  Or (3) Americans are not living in a state governed by the rule of law but, as Giorgio Agamben believes, in a "state of exception"....

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VIDEO: A Christmas message from 2013's person of the year, Edward Snowden

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In a short, pithy 1:45 message, Edward Snowden told British Channel 4 viewers (and the world) why mass surveillance is wrong and why privacy matters.  --  COMMENT:  By any reasonable standard, Edward Snowden should be 2013's Person of the Year....

Last Updated on Thursday, 26 December 2013 08:53 Read more...
 

BACKGROUND: Pentagon, never audited, 'has for years kept lousy books with impunity' (Reuters)

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At the Pentagon, efforts to end fiscal waste and mismanagement are just another way to waste money.  --  Reuters reported Monday that "Burdened with thousands of old, error-filled record-keeping systems -- estimates range from 2,100 to more than 5,000 of them -- the Pentagon is unable to account for itself, and thus for roughly half of all congressionally approved annual federal spending.  --  To fix that, the Defense Department has launched 20 or more projects to build modern business-management systems since the late 1990s.  --  At least five were subsequently killed as complete failures after billions of dollars were spent on them."  --  None of them are going to succeed, because the Pentagon has figured out how to ensure they fail.  --  That's a reasonable conclusion from Scot Paltrow's discovery that if you study the Pentagon's putative efforts at accounting reform, "a pattern emerges:  An off-the-shelf product with a proven track record in the private sector is chosen and then modified to the point where it doesn’t work properly."  --  What the Pentagon gets away with is often criminal, Paltrow reported.  --  And the Pentagon has never been audited.  --  "All other federal agencies are audited annually, in accordance with a 1990 law, and with rare exceptions, they pass every year.  --  The Pentagon alone has never been audited, leaving roughly $8.5 trillion in taxpayer dollars unaccounted for since 1996, the first year it was supposed to be audited."  --  COMMENT:  Paltrow left it to the reader to draw the obvious conclusion:  the Pentagon wants its accounting to be impenetrable, in order to maintain a bureaucratic culture characterized by "a lack of accountability for failures, rivalry among and within various branches of the department, resistance to change, and an incentive to spend."  --  And he never alluded to the elephant in the room:  American militarism.  --  Only a culture of militarism can explain mismanagement on a trillion-dollar scale....

Last Updated on Tuesday, 24 December 2013 08:06 Read more...
 

CALENDAR: Save these dates -- Fri., Jan. 10 & Sat., Feb. 8!

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UFPPC will cosponsor an important event in Tacoma on Sat., Feb. 8: a joint presentation by nationally known whistleblowers Jesselyn Radack and Thomas Drake at the Washington State History Museum.  --  While this event will be free to the public, it involves considerable expense, and on Fri., Jan. 10, at the Tacoma Urban League, we're having a fundraising party to help raise money to defray some of the expenses of the event.  --  So please put these events on your calendar, and help us spread the word about them.  --  See below for more information on these events.[1] ...

Last Updated on Monday, 23 December 2013 23:55 Read more...
 

COMMENTARY: In historic shift, Chinese 'furiously brushing up on their Mahan' (P. Escobar)

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Things are getting more complicated in East Asia.  --  "Communication had better be damned 'effective' from now on as China asserts itself as a rising sea power and it's obviously unclear who can really do what in the South as well as the East China Sea, not to mention the oceans beyond," observed Pepe Escobar on Wednesday on the Asia Times Online website.[1]  --  Escobar referred to a January 2013 article in the South China Morning Post, reproduced below, noting that it was in November 2012 that President Hu Jintao "for the first time declared China's ambition to 'build itself into a maritime power.'"[2]  --  According to Cary Huang, "the overwhelming belief among the establishment and academics is that China, which has growing influence over many of its smaller Asian neighbors, should be more than just a continental power, as its land-based strategic culture constrained its ability to become a global power."  --  Chinese academic research and internal discussion show "reverence" for the 1890 classic of geostrategy by Alfred Mahan, The Influence of Sea Power upon History, 1660-1783, Huang said.  --  He quoted Professor John Lee of the University of Sydney:  "China has been a continental power for several centuries.  --  The shift from continental to maritime power and in military doctrine is inherently unsettling for all Asian states."  --  Meanwhile, the U.S. is continuing a "strategic shift towards the Asia-Pacific region" that "will see 60 per cent of U.S. warships move to the region by the end of the decade.  --  That's a plan Beijing believes is intended to contain a rising China.  --  It's a plan that will lead to two maritime giants congesting a shrinking ocean." ...

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NEWS: Israel lobby aiming to push sanctions bill through Congress, torpedo White House Iran initiative

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In "the biggest test of the political clout of the Israel lobby . . . in decades," a struggle is looming over a bill intended to sabotage the P5+1 effort to resolve peacefully the stand-off with Iran over its nuclear program, Inter Press Service reported Saturday.[1]  --  The White House says President Obama will veto the "Nuclear Weapon Free Iran Act" if it is passed, but supporters of the bill are banking on being able to overcome a veto.  --  The main battle, Jim Lobe said, will take place "within the Democratic majority," where "loyalty to Obama" will be up against "fear that new sanctions will indeed derail negotiations and thus make war more likely, . . . general antipathy for Iran, and the influence exerted by AIPAC and associated groups as a result of the questionable perception that Israel’s security is uppermost in the minds of Jewish voters and campaign contributors (who, by some estimates, provide as much as 40 percent of political donations to Democrats in national campaigns)."  --  "Since it lost a major battle with former President Ronald Reagan over a huge arms sale to Saudi Arabia in the early 1980s, the Israel lobby has generally avoided directly confronting a sitting president, but, at this point, it appears determined to take on Obama over Iran."  --  Lobe quoted a former senior AIPAC executive who suggested that AIPAC's motivation may be self-interest:  AIPAC's leaders are said to be "terrified they’re going to lose their major fund-raising appeal" if the Iran-P5+1 stand-off is resolved...

Last Updated on Sunday, 22 December 2013 05:29 Read more...
 

VIDEO: On the social-psychological effects of wealth and status

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"The wealthier you are, the more likely  you are to pursue a vision of personal success, of achievement and accomplishment, to the detriment of others around you."  --  This, U.C. Berkeley psychologist Paul Piff says, is the conclusion supported by dozens of social psychology experiments he and colleagues have carried out.  --  Piff discussed his findings in a 16-minute TED talk delivered in October.[1]  --  They suggest that increasing levels of inequality like those that increasingly characterize American society will inevitably lead to less social mobility, lower economic growth, a more stunted community life, a decline in levels of social trust, lower life expectancy, poorer educational performance, and poorer physical health.  --  At the same time, they tend to cause obesity, drug abuse, teenage pregnancies, and rates of violence, imprisonment, and punishment to rise.  --  On a more positive note, studies by Piff and others show that reminders and "nudges" recalling the value of cooperation, community, and compassion can revive benevolence in persons possessing greater wealth and status...

Last Updated on Saturday, 21 December 2013 15:46 Read more...
 

COMMENTARY: 'Time for team in White House & NSA to stop defending indefensible'

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On Tuesday the CEO and editor of Foreign Policy urged President Obama to "stop defending the indefensible," fire the head of the NSA, and admit that "There is no justification for the systematic abuses by the NSA or for the defense of those abuses by the president and his team."  --  The emperor has no clothes:  "[T]he U.S. government has committed the most grotesque violation of the principles on which it was founded since its acceptance of the mechanisms of racism and sexism of the past century," said David Rothkopf.  --  "Don't wait for appeals to make their way through the judiciary to do what is right."  --   And, he added, it is time that Americans stop debating whether Edward Snowden was right to do what he did and debate instead whether James Madison, the architect of the United States Constitution, was right when he said:  "If tyranny and oppression come to this land it will be in the guise of fighting a foreign enemy."  --  And:  "The means of defence against foreign danger have been always the instruments of tyranny at home."  --  And:  "No nation could preserve its freedom in the midst of continual warfare."  --  And:  "All men having power ought to be distrusted to a certain degree."  --  And:  "I believe there are more instances of the abridgement of the freedom of the people by gradual and silent encroachments by those in power than by violent and sudden usurpations." ...

Last Updated on Wednesday, 18 December 2013 07:37 Read more...
 

NEWS: Judge rules NSA 'may not hang a cloak of secrecy over the Constitution'

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Judge Richard Leon of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia ruled Monday "that the mass collection of metadata probably violates the Fourth Amendment, which prohibits unreasonable searches and seizures, and was 'almost Orwellian' in its scope. . . . [H]e said James Madison, the architect of the U.S. Constitution, would be 'aghast' at the scope of the agency’s collection of Americans' communications data," the London Guardian reported.[1]  --  The ruling, which was greeted by Edward Snowden by a rare statement saying it vindicated his whistleblowing, "sets up a legal battle that will drag on for months, almost certainly destined to end up in the Supreme Court," Spencer Ackerman and Dan Roberts said.  --  The New York Times noted that "The case is the first in which a federal judge who is not on the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which authorized the once-secret program, has examined the bulk data collection on behalf of someone who is not a criminal defendant."[2]  --  "Judge Leon, appointed to the bench in 2002 by President George W. Bush, stayed his injunction 'in light of the significant national security interests at stake in this case and the novelty of the constitutional issues,' allowing the government time to appeal it, which he said could take at least six months," Charlie Savage said....

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ANALYSIS: Saudi money is financing a 'rerun of Afghanistan' in Syria

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In the aftermath of the Free Syrian Army's commander being run out of northern Syria by the Islamic Front, "[c]onfusion over what is happening is so great that Western leaders may not pay as much of a political price at home as they should for the failure of their Syrian policy," veteran Mideast correspondent Patrick Cockburn said in the London Independent on Thursday.[1]  --  "[I]t is worth recalling that the Syrian National Coalition and the FSA are the same people for whom the U.S. and U.K. almost went to war in August . . . The recent debacle shows how right public opinion in both countries was to reject military intervention."  --  The Saudis' "limitless funds" are a big part of the problem, Cockburn said.  --  "[T]his summer . . . Saudi Arabia took over from Qatar as chief supporter of the rebels."  --  However, "it looks highly unlikely that Saudi money will be enough to bring down or even significantly weaken Assad though it may be enough to keep a war going for years."  --  "The U.S., Britain, and France do not have many options left except to try to control the jihadi Frankenstein’s monster that they helped create in Syria and which is already helping destabilize Iraq and Lebanon."  --  "All U.S., British, and French miscalculations have produced in Syria is a re-run of Afghanistan in the 1980s, creating a situation the ruinous consequences of which have yet to appear.  --  As jihadis in Syria realize they are not going to win, they may well look for targets closer to home." ...

Last Updated on Monday, 16 December 2013 06:50 Read more...
 

NEWS: US unable to determine extent of Snowden's leaks

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After spending hundreds of hours trying to reconstruct how Edward Snowden obtained the classified documents whose leaking has rocked the U.S. national security state establishment, officials have "concluded that they may never know the entirety of what" he took, "partly because the NSA facility in Hawaii where Mr. Snowden worked -- unlike other NSA facilities -- was not equipped with up-to-date software," the New York Times reported Saturday.[1]  --  Although Snowden has said he gave all the documents he downloaded to journalists and kept no additional copies, "[i]n recent days, a senior NSA official has told reporters that he believed Mr. Snowden still had access to documents not yet disclosed," Mark Mazzetti and Michael Schmidt said.  --  "The official, Rick Ledgett, who is heading the security agency’s task force examining Mr. Snowden’s leak, said he would consider recommending amnesty for Mr. Snowden in exchange for those documents." ...

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BACKGROUND & COMMENTARY: China's 'Confucius Institutes' are antithetical to university values

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In a 7,000-word article published in October in The Nation, anthropologist Marshall Sahlins made a strong argument against the China-subsidized Confucius Institutes that are being set up in more and more universities in the U.S. and elsewhere.[1]  --  Confucius Institutes are unquestionably part of China's "overseas propaganda set-up," to use Politburo Li Changchun's phrase.  --  "[B]y hosting a Confucius Institute," Sahlins argued, univeristies "have become engaged in the political and propaganda efforts of a foreign government in a way that contradicts the values of free inquiry and human welfare to which they are otherwise committed."  --  According to Sahlins, by limiting instruction to Standard Chinese Characters, the Chinese government is guaranteeing that the scholars these institutes produce will be "only semi-literate in Chinese" and will be "[u]nable to read the classics except in versions translated and interpreted in the PRC."[1]  --  Because "the model agreement establishing [Confucius Institute] . . . is secret," it is hard to evaluate their operation.  --  But Sahlins accused American universities of being "concerned only with their parochial welfare as academic institutions."  --  "Directly or indirectly, but ever-increasingly, American institutions of higher learning are heavily dependent on Chinese money."  --  As an example of this, Sahlins cited the 2,062 students from China at the Univ. of Iowa, where 21% of business school students are Chinese.  --  "The number of students from mainland China grew from 98,235 in 2008-09 to 127,628 in 2009-10 and 157,558 in 2010-11."  --  C.I.s "endow most affiliated universities with an initial fee of $100,000 or $150,000 and annual payments along the same lines for the duration of the contract, as well as free instructors, textbooks, and course materials, a number of scholarships for study in China, and upscale, wine-and-dine junkets to China for American administrators."  --  NOTE:  In Washington State, a "Confucius Institute of the State of Washington" was set up in 2009 with an agreement signed by the University of Washington and Seattle Public Schools....

Last Updated on Sunday, 15 December 2013 02:08 Read more...
 

BACKGROUND: AP reveals Robert Levinson was working for CIA when he disappeared in Iran

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The longstanding mystery of Robert Levinson's disappearance lost some of its mystery on Thursday, when AP decided to publish a story about the nature of Robert Levinson's activities when he disappeared in March 2007 in Iran.[1] ...

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NEWS: Hersh report on White House’s Syria lies blacked out in US mainstream media

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Seymour’s Hersh important exposé of White House misrepresentations about the Aug. 21 sarin attack in Syria and mainstream media complicity in them was refused by both the New Yorker and the Washington Post before it was published on Saturday in the London Review of Books, the Huffington Post reported Sunday.[1]  --  These publications have so far refused to comment on their failure to publish the piece by Hersh, an investigative reporter of legendary stature and prestige who broke the My Lai Massacre story in 1969 and helped break the Abu Ghraib story in 2004.  --  Hersh’s information has been almost completely blacked out of major U.S. mainstream media (the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Baltimore Sun, the Seattle Times, the Christian Science Monitor, the Boston Globe, the Miami Herald, the Minneapolis Star Tribune, CNN, etc., have made no mention of it; the Los Angeles Times did devote one sentence in passing to Hersh’s 5000-word article on Dec. 12 ).  --  Hersh has said that the Post raised sourcing issues, but a senior editor at the London Review of Books said that Hersh’s article, entitled “Whose Sarin?,” was not only edited, but thoroughly fact checked by a former New Yorker fact checker who had worked with Hersh in the past.”  --  WSWS devoted a piece on Wednesday to the news blackout, calling it “a highly conscious operation.”[2]  --  Democracy Now!, however, reported on the story on Monday, interviewing Hersh at length about his report.  --  COMMENT:  The most remarkable thing Hersh told Democracy Now! has not received any attention, as far as we know:  “[T]here was incredible opposition that will be, one of these days, written about, maybe in history books. There was incredible operation [Hersh evidently means ‘opposition’; ‘operation’ makes no sense -- there other places where the 76-year-old Hersh, who tends to ramble, misspeaks in the interview] from some very, very strong-minded, constitutionally minded people in the Pentagon.  That’s the real story.  I don’t have it.  I could just tell you I know it.” ...

Last Updated on Saturday, 14 December 2013 08:48 Read more...
 

NEWS: US freezes aid after top US-backed rebel commander 'run out' of Syria by Islamic Front

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Over the weekend, Islamist fighters kicked the top U.S.-backed rebel commander out of his HQ and he had to flee to Turkey, leading shocked Americans to conclude that the Free Syrian Army is "collapsing under the pressure of Islamist domination of the rebel side of the war" and to freeze aid to rebels in northern Syria, the Wall Street Journal reported Wednesday.[1]  --  "[T]there are growing signs that the SMC is losing legitimacy among the increasing ranks of Islamist rebels," said Adam Entous and Rima Abushakra....

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Meeting schedule

United for Peace of Pierce County meets 7:00-8:30 p.m. on the first and third Thursdays of every month at First United Methodist Church in Tacoma (621 Tacoma Avenue South).

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