The confrontation in Oaxaca turned violent late Saturday.  --  "Court offices in one of Oaxaca's imposing colonial buildings were gutted by flames and the gangs burned 20 private vehicles and attacked three hotels, throwing gasoline bombs at one and smashing windows at two," AP reported.[1]  --  "Fires also damaged four buildings housing government offices, one university building, and the state hotel association, which has seen tourism reduced to a trickle by six months of demonstrations and violence.  Some of the youthful protesters looted several shops."  --  AP blamed "leftist protestors."  --  But the Guardian said that "The Popular Assembly of the People of Oaxaca, APPO, which heads the protest movement, blamed infiltrators for the violence.  At one point, APPO's leader, Flavio Sosa, was shouted down when he appealed for order.  He told reporters:  'The APPO declares that the situation is out of control.'"[2]  --  "But while APPO has lost territory, the group still commands public support and there is no indication that it is about to dissolve," Jo Tuckman reported from Mexico City.   "The chaos in Oaxaca, and the thorny question of how to extricate federal forces, poses a serious challenge for the president-elect, Felipe Calderón, when he takes office on Friday."  --  A Spanish-language report from the web site La Jornada blamed authorities for instigating the violence.[3]  --  So did a report posted on the San Francisco Indymedia site Sunday evening, which indicated that a brutal repression is underway in Oaxaca.[4] ...

1.

World

MEXICAN RIOTERS TORCH OFFICES, VEHICLES

Associated Press
November 26, 2006

Original source: Associated Press

OAXACA, Mexico -- Leftist protesters trying to force out the governor in the Mexican state Oaxaca set fire to another building Sunday after a night of torching government offices and vehicles in running street battles with police that injured at least 43 people.

The violence broke out late Saturday after masked youths broke away from a protest march by about 4,000 people and began attacking police and buildings in picturesque Oaxaca.

Youths hurled rocks, fireworks, and gasoline bombs in a failed attempt to encircle federal police holding the main square, which security forces took back in late October from protesters who had held it for months demanding Gov. Ulises Ruiz resign for alleged corruption.

Police drove off the attackers with tear gas and jets of water from tanker trucks, then advanced in massed ranks to drive protesters from a camp at a smaller plaza two blocks away.

But bands of young people rampaged through downtown, pushing shopping carts filled with rocks and gasoline bombs.

Court offices in one of Oaxaca's imposing colonial buildings were gutted by flames and the gangs burned 20 private vehicles and attacked three hotels, throwing gasoline bombs at one and smashing windows at two.

Fires also damaged four buildings housing government offices, one university building and the state hotel association, which has seen tourism reduced to a trickle by six months of demonstrations and violence. Some of the youthful protesters looted several shops.

Firefighters quelled the blazes by early Sunday but later in the day protesters set a tax office on fire.

Downtown residents watched in horror as buildings burned and streets filled with choking clouds of tear gas and smoke.

Oaxaca resident Josefina Quiros said protesters loosely organized under the leftist People's Assembly of Oaxaca were spreading fear.

“We are terrified of the APPO people,” she said, referring to the movement by its Spanish initials.

In a statement, the federal police said 152 people had been arrested and accused outside activists of participating in the unrest, which it said resulted in injuries to four officers and an unspecified number of bystanders.

The statement also said federal police would no longer stay mainly at posts in the main square and a few other spots around the city but would actively patrol in search of those responsible for “direct attacks on federal police.”

State prosecutors said at least 43 people were injured. It was unclear whether that figure included police officers and three journalists who suffered minor injuries during the confrontations.

Prosecutors said there were no reports of deaths. Marcelino Coache, a spokesman for the anti-Ruiz movement, said some protesters suffered serious injuries.

Making one of his first visits downtown since protesters forced state officials out in May, Oaxaca's governor viewed the damage and threatened to punish those responsible.

“All the weight of the law will be applied to those who have committed these acts of vandalism,” Mr. Ruiz said.

Mr. Ruiz earlier blamed the disturbance on radical groups from Mexico City.

“These are the death throes of a movement that has already disintegrated,” he said at a news conference.

The unrest began as a strike by teachers but mushroomed into a broad protest against social and economic injustices in the poor state. Protesters focused their anger on Mr. Ruiz, accusing him of brutality, corruption, and electoral fraud.

A majority of teachers have returned to work and did not participate in Saturday night's demonstration.

Nine people have been killed over the months, including freelance video journalist Bradley Roland Will, 36, of New York City, who was filming a group of leftist protesters clashing with a group of armed men. Guns were fired by both sides, although it was not clear who shot first.

2.

FRESH FLARE-UP IN MEXICO'S CULTURAL JEWEL
By Jo Tuckman

** 100 held, many hurt but governor refuses to quit -- New president faces crisis as Oaxaca battles rage on **

Guardian (UK)
November 27, 2006

http://www.guardian.co.uk/international/story/0,,1957725,00.html

MEXICO CITY -- Protesters hurling petrol bombs clashed with police in Oaxaca at the weekend in the latest flare-up of a conflict that has engulfed the graceful colonial city in southern Mexico for more than six months.

Buildings, including the supreme court of Oaxaca state, shops, and restaurants, were set ablaze, and several streets were blocked by burning vehicles.

The battle began when the protesters -- demanding the resignation of the state governor Ulises Ruiz -- tried to encircle federal police who have occupied the city's central plaza for almost a month.

Columns of police, backed by water cannon, pushed the rioters back, while coming under a hail of projectiles, many of them fireworks shot from homemade bazooka-like tubes.

The protesters said 38 activists had been injured, two seriously, while the Red Cross said it assisted 80 people.

The Popular Assembly of the People of Oaxaca, APPO, which heads the protest movement, blamed infiltrators for the violence. At one point, APPO's leader, Flavio Sosa, was shouted down when he appealed for order. He told reporters: "The APPO declares that the situation is out of control."

Police had resumed control of the central area by yesterday. Authorities said about 100 people had been arrested. The conflict in Oaxaca began as a teachers' pay dispute in May, but soon grew into a much broader protest against poverty and social injustice in the state.

APPO was formed in June from a diverse collection of social groups, and took control of the city center, effectively running Governor Ruiz out of town. Human rights groups allege that the governor responded by ordering a number of paramilitary-style shootings.

APPO says 14 activists have been killed during the conflict, including a United States cameraman, whose death helped trigger the federal police occupation last month. President Vicente Fox ordered the federal forces into Oaxaca with a brief to re-establish order, but they are seen by protesters as helping Mr. Ruiz to hang on to power.

The governor has refused to resign, despite strong hints -- from the federal government and his own party -- that he should do so. He now maintains that the conflict is all but resolved. He responded to the weekend's battle by demanding more arrests, saying the clashes were "the lashing tail of a deflated movement."

But while APPO has lost territory, the group still commands public support and there is no indication that it is about to dissolve. The chaos in Oaxaca, and the thorny question of how to extricate federal forces, poses a serious challenge for the president-elect, Felipe Calderón, when he takes office on Friday.

Meanwhile, Oaxaca's tourist industry has effectively shut down. British and other foreign diplomatic missions have posted travel warnings about a city once considered a jewel among Mexico's tourist attractions -- mixing architectural splendour with colorful indigenous traditions and culinary exoticism.

3.

HAY INDICIOS EVIDENTES DE PROVODADORES EN OAXACA: ENCINAS
Bertha Teresa Ramírez

La Jornada
November 26, 2006

http://www.jornada.unam.mx:8080/ultimas/hay-indicios-evidentes-de-provocadores-en-oaxaca-encinas

MÉXICO, DF -- Tras calificar de lamentables los nuevos enfrentamientos en Oaxaca, el jefe de Gobierno del Distrito Federal, Alejandro Encinas, señaló que en esos hechos hay indicios evidentes de una provocación respecto de la cual hay que estar atentos.

Encinas hizo referencia a gente que no está identificada plenamente, y se preguntó a qué intereses está sirviendo: "porque incluso los propios dirigentes de la APPO (Asamblea Popular de los Pueblos de Oaxaca) fueron atacados por estas personas, y yo sí creo que el gobierno federal debe hacer un trabajo exhaustivo de inteligencia para evitar que este tipo de provocaciones no sólo cree un clima de mayor violencia y tensión en esa entidad, sino que se impida que se extienda a otras entidades de la República."

Dijo que los enfrentamientos ocurridos en aquel estado constituyen un mal indicio para los acontecimientos de la próxima semana. En el caso del gobierno de la ciudad estará muy atento a mantener la estabilidad y la normalidad en la ciudad.

4.

HUMAN'S RIGHTS CRISIS IN OAXACA
By Callforaction

** Mexican government keeps using represion and terror against Oaxaca's population. APPO makes desperate calls for action and solidarity. **

Indymedia
November 26, 2006

http://sf.indymedia.org/news/2006/11/1733155.php

Population of Oaxaca has been sufering from ungovernavility, paramilitary a wave of terror on behalf of the state and of a military like ocupation by federal police, during a conflict that has lasted up to seven months and has no end in sight. Supporters and members of the Popular Assembly of the People of Oaxaca, have been under constant attack. Humans right's are practically nonexistent in the state, and the hit keeps rising.

As the conflict grows older, it also has become more and more violent. Humans right's violations are a daything on Oaxaca streets. The popular movenet concentrated on the APPO at first suffered the attacks of the state police, PRI party members and supporters of Governor Ulíses Ruís Ortíz. He also puted together a paramilitary group known as the “Caravan of Death,” heavily armed with AK-47 and R-15 rifles, 9mm guns and other weapons wich in México are only for army use. Using pickup trucks and police vehicles they have been shooting at unarmed civillians.

Also APPO members and activists in general are under constant threat. From annonymous menaces to kidnaping are some of the risks they run everyday. Some get “lifted,” and then after a few days, they appear on a jail, tortured, beaten up, charged with false acusations poorly scheemed. Others don't appear at all. At first in an internet site called “Oaxaca in Peace,” and later in an illegal radio station wich supports URO, calls have been made for attacking APPO leaders and other movement figures, giving their adresses and other personal data. Lately they invite people to burn down the house of the “La Doctora” one of the most known female voices of APPO's Radio Universidad.

The presence of the Federal Police instead of bringing peace and order to the state, like the government declared, has brought more tension and violence taking the crisis to a higher level. It hasn't stoped the paramilitary or put an end to the priístas provocations. On the contrary since the police removed APPO's barricades the attackers can move more easily. The federal police, acting like an ocupation army, seted up positions in strategic spots around the city and stablished camp in downtown. In a series of violent clashes the police have been repressing the movement, but failed to crush it. They're more than six thousand elements, with militar and air support, acompanied with ten riot tanks, fully equiped, heavily armed. Oaxaca is virtually under siege.

Yesterday repression made obvious the complicity between the paramilitary with police and government forces. Priístas provoqued the protestors. Then Federal Police attacked the pacific march with gas, shooting the cans at close range directly to the body. Then the riot eruptud, and at a moment there were clashes in fourteen diferent spots around downtown. There were many massive arrests, all of them very violent. Police also shooted against people. Many were reported wounded but couldn't be attended at hospitals because these were surrounded by police. Protesters were forced to look for shelter within the neighbouring houses. Again the paramilitary were seen on theire trucks. Police dressed as civilians, also heavily armed, ran through the streets shooting and taking away anyone, not just protesters but anyone. Oficialy, URO declared there were one hundred and sixty detained ones. The lists of dissapeared people grows longer. Many are hidden in houses in small groups, afraid of getting out and be arrested or worst, “lifted up.”.

The popular movement in Oaxaca has been resisting for a long time an increasing state of terror and violence. But a long term conflict usually weakens mobilizations. Shootings, kidnapings and illegal detentions have become common in the life of the state. Everyday there are reports of dissapeared people, or witnesses of a “lift up.” Also complaints of police harrasment or menaces. Barricades, and even medical outspots are attacked with fire everyday. The lists of disapeared ones are almost imposible to keep up to date. This constant attacks have been hitting hard on the movement and causing alarm and panic. It has been forced to withdraw. State and Federal goverments keep making declarations with no connection with reality, while they keep using represion and pouring fuel on the fire. Such a gathering of forces against one popular movement has had it's effect. At this moment, calls that people make to the station, Radio Universidad, are desperate, asking for help and support. The harrasment in the streets is constant. Police keeps attacking protesters and breaking into homes. Last reports indicate that federal forces are closing in on the University. The barricades ask for support. The APPO fears another big scale attemp to take over the university.

(Sorry for the bad english)