United for Peace of Pierce County, WA - We nonviolently oppose the reliance on unilateral military actions rather than cooperative diplomacy.

ANALYSIS: Foreign policy views of the leading candidates unknown or all-too-known

E-mail Print

In the estimation of Stephen Walt, writing in Foreign Policy, the 2016 presidential race is down to five candidates: Hillary Clinton, Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio, Bernie Sanders, and Donald Trump (in alphabetical order).  --  What would it would it mean for foreign policy if one of them is elected?  --  "A Clinton foreign policy will look a lot like Barack Obama’s, but with a decidedly more hawkish edge."[1]  --  "A Ted Cruz presidency would probably make George W. Bush-style 'unilateralism' seem like a Quaker meeting."  --  "Rubio is the only candidate who seems to have fully embraced the discredited PNAC worldview."  --  "It’s hard to know how [Bernie Sanders] would deal with any of the big-ticket items on the foreign-policy agenda or by what means he’d implement whatever goals he eventually comes up with."  --  As for Trump, "we have no idea what Trump’s foreign policy would be."  --  But "no president gets to run foreign policy on their own, and the things they say in a campaign often bear little resemblance to what they end up doing in office." ...

Read more...
 

BACKGROUND: Saudi Arabia's oil war is not going well

E-mail Print

Syria is not only a civil war, a religious war, and a proxy war, it is now also an important factor in an oil war instigated in 2014 by Saudi Arabia.  --  U.S. mainstream media were slow to call attention to this development, but that Saudi Arabia's decision to drive down the price of oil is an "oil war" was noted in the New York Post in Dec. 2014 by Ralph Peters the retired lieutenant colonel who became (in)famous in 2006 when he proposed redrawing the map of the Middle East in Armed Forces Journal.  --  According to Peters, Saudi Arabia was "doing what the Obama administration lacked the guts to do:  It’s smacking down our enemies," viz. Iran and Russia.[1]  --  A few months later, though, Berlin-based Leonid Bershidsky argued that Saudi Arabia's price war was aimed principally at the North American fracking industry.[2]  --  A Pakistani journalist observed that Saudi Arabia was in danger of falling into a trap of its own making.  --  Saudi Arabia's effort to sustain its budget expenditures in the face of steeply declining oil revenues risks bankrupting the country:  "[I]nstead of driving producers of expensive oil from the market and feasting on a recovery in oil prices, the expected addition of Iranian oil to the market will knock prices down further."[3]  --  A few weeks later, after Russia intervened militarily in Syria, Bershidsky argued that Saudi Arabia's oil price war was now aimed Russia, and the world could therefore expect "a more active shoving match between the world's two biggest oil exporters, which already are at odds over the Syrian conflict. . . . if the Chinese economy continues performing worse than expected, that market may become too small for the Russians and the Saudis.  --  Both economies are oil-dependent and retaining market share is a matter of survival."[4]  --  Blogger Tyler Durden also believes that the price war was not going well for Saudi Arabia:  "the kingdom is literally going broke as the budget deficit is set to come in at an astounding 20% of GDP and the current account plunges into the red as well.  --  As for the Russians, not only did they not abandon their support for Assad, they in fact struck up a closer alliance with Iran, whose oil supply threatens to add to the global deflationary supply glut once sanctions are fully lifted."[5]  --  Thus the Saudi oil war has been "a miserable failure thus far."  --  Last week, however, the London Telegraph reported that "Saudi Arabia has vowed to continue flooding the global market with oil despite the collapse in Brent prices to a 12-year low, insisting that it will not cut output until Russia and other non-OPEC countries agree to share the burden."  --  Saudi Arabia, it seems, is still intent on "flushing out rivals."[6]  --  But if a piece published Saturday by Global Research is to be believed, the Saudi regime is more likely to be flushed out first.[7] ...

Last Updated on Wednesday, 27 January 2016 01:55 Read more...
 

LECTURE: Phyllis Bennis to speak about ISIS on Thurs., Feb. 4 @ 7pm

E-mail Print

On Thurs., Feb. 4, at 7:00 p.m., noted author and foreign policy analyst Phyllis Bennis of the Institute for Policy Studies will speak in University Place about ISIS and the crisis in Syria.[1]  --  Bennis is the author of a recent 216-page book on ISIS.  --  UFPPC is proud to be a co-sponsor of her talk....

Read more...
 

BACKGROUND: Summary of Hersh's critique of Obama's Syria policy

E-mail Print

Seymour Hersh mounted an attack on Barack Obama's anti-Assad, pro-Erdogan Syria policy last month with a long, detailed article on the website of the London Review of Books.  --  (The piece also appears in the Jan. 7, 2016, number of that exceptionally intelligent publication.)  --  The assertions of the article have been judged to be beyond the pale by U.S. mainstream media and all but blacked out, for reasons that will be obvious from this brief...  --  SUMMARY:  Hersh reports that the Pentagon concluded in 2013 that Obama's decision to aid so-called "moderate" Syrian rebels in their effort to overthrow Syrian President Bashar al-Assad was in fact "arming extremists" and decided to do something about it without informing Obama.[1]  --  "The Joint Chiefs felt that a direct challenge to Obama’s policy would have ‘had a zero chance of success.’   --  So in the autumn of 2013 they decided to take steps against the extremists without going through political channels, by providing U.S. intelligence to the militaries of other nations, on the understanding that it would be passed on to the Syrian army and used against the common enemy, Jabhat al-Nusra and Islamic State."  --  In addition, the Joint Chiefs found a way to downgrade the quality of weapons being shipped to Syrian rebels covertly (Hersh notes in passing, by the way, that Ambassador Christopher Stevens was in Benghazi to help organize the gun-running when he was killed in Sept. 2012, another datum that is unacceptable to U.S. mainstream media).  --  Hersh also demonstrated at some length that the Joint Chiefs are far from sharing Obama's (and the U.S. mainstream media's) anti-Russian views.  --  Hersh's chief source in this piece is an unnamed "former senior adviser to the Joint Chiefs."  --  He has other sources as well:  "Imad Moustapha, now Syria’s ambassador to China, . . dean of the I.T. faculty at the University of Damascus, and a close aide of Assad’s," an unnamed "Washington foreign affairs analyst," and Christina Lin, "a scholar who dealt with Chinese issues a decade ago while serving in the Pentagon under Donald Rumsfeld."  --  They told Hersh that Chinese-Turkish tensions are rising because Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is helping Muslim Uyghur fighters get to Syria to fight for the Islamic State, and Chinese leaders believe it likely they will later return to wage a separatist campaign in Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region in western China.  --  Hersh also interviewed U.S. Army Gen. (ret.) Michael Flynn, the former director of the Defense Intelligence Agency who was canned by President Obama for, according to Hersh, telling the truth about Syria and supporting cooperation with Russia, and Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii 2nd), a member of the House Armed Services Committee who is publicly taking the same position....

Last Updated on Tuesday, 12 January 2016 06:01 Read more...
 

BACKGROUND: Appointment in Samarra

E-mail Print

In a 5,000-word piece published in Dec. 2014 in the London Guardian, Australian journalist Martin Chulov gave an account of ISIS's origins.  --  It is based on interviews with a jihadist using the name Abu Ahmed.  --  According to this jihadist, ISIS's origins are to be found in the U.S.-run prison in Iraq known as Camp Bucca, which was in use from 2003 to 2009.  --  Chulov says he has been in contact with this "senior leader" of ISIS since 2012.  --  Abu Ahmed's account of the group's origins in "a series of expansive conversations" is due to his "second thoughts" about ISIS, but he is afraid to leave the group lest he and his family be killed as a result.[1]  --  On this basis, Chulov reported...  --  THE STORY:  Ibrahim ibn Awwad al-Badri al-Samarrai, the man who would become ISIS's leader and self-proclaimed caliph of all of Islam, was born in 1971 in Samarra, and was already the leader of a militant group when, at the age of 33 and the holder of a Ph.D. in Islamic Studies from the Islamic University of Baghdad, he was captured by U.S. forces in Fallujah in February 2004.  --  But the U.S. didn't know this.  --  Americans used his influence and apparent docility to help settle disputes in the camp, and then awarded him privileges which he used to network with other jihadists (writing contact information on the elastic bands of their boxer shorts for future reference).  --  He thus laid the basis of what has now become ISIS.  --  "If there was no American prison in Iraq, there would be no I.S. now," Abu Ahmed told Chulov.  --  "Bucca was a factory.  --  It made us all.  --  It built our ideology."  --  According to this version, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad helped ISIS develop because he was interested in destabilizing the American-backed regime in Baghdad.  --  To that end, in 2009 Assad's government facilitated a meeting of Syrian military intelligence officers with former Baathists who had taken refuge in Syria and senior al-Qaeda in Iraq (as what would become ISIS or the Islamic State was then called).  --  There, according to Iraq's then-intelligence chief, these former enemies made common cause for the first time on this occasion and organized spectacular attacks inside Iraq.  --  Abu Ahmed has become fatalistic:  "[ISIS] got bigger than any of us.  --  This can’t be stopped now.  --  This is out of the control of any man.  --  Not Baghdadi, or anyone else in his circle."  --  NOTE:  In September 2015, Chulov wrote that "I remain in regular contact [with Abu Ahmed, who] remains disaffected with the group, which he believes has strayed well beyond its original remit of fighting the U.S. Army and defending Sunnis against their marginalization in post-Saddam Iraq."  --  Martin Chulov's account is cited as authoritative in Gwynne Dyer's Don't Panic: ISIS, Terror, and Today's Middle East (Random House of Canada, 2015) and Michael Weiss & Hassan Hassan's ISIS: Inside the Army of Terror (Simon and Schuster, 2015).  --  Chulov has been called "one of the supreme journalists working in the field [of jihadism]" in John Stapleton's Terror in Australia: Workers' Paradise Lost (A Sense of Place Publishing, 2015).  --  Though a few have spoken admiringly of Chulov's "incredible interview" and "incredible scoop," I'm aware of no serious critic who has impugned Chulov's account in the year since it was published.  --  Still, one would think that this account would make it possible for the ISIS leadership without much difficulty to identify Abu Ahmed.  --  For those wondering how Chulov manages to be "in regular contact" with an ISIS leader, a thirty-minute Pacifica Radio conversation with him about reporting on Syria can be listened to on Soundcloud, in which he says he depends mostly on virtual private networks to communicate with sources....

Last Updated on Wednesday, 06 January 2016 00:39 Read more...
 

ANALYSIS: Saudi Arabia's US PR machine in action after mass execution

E-mail Print

The governments of U.S. and Saudi Arabia have been close allies for decades, and mainstream media in the United States are strongly influenced by pro-Saudi propagandists, as Lee Fang and Zaid Jilani demonstrated on Monday in an article in The Intercept analyzing how news of Saudi Arabia's Jan. 2 mass execution is being reported.[1] ...

Read more...
 

TRANSLATION: Riyadh and Tehran spiraling toward abyss of war (Le Monde)

E-mail Print

Comparing Saudi Arabia and Iran to "the sleepwalkers of 1914 . . . inexorably advancing toward the abyss of war," Le Monde (Paris) sounded an alarm Monday in an editorial translated below.[1]  --  "[E]ach of these two powers, already shaken by the spectacular drop in the price of oil since 2014, feels besieged and threatened.  --  Tehran, which thinks it made an unprecedented gesture by renouncing its nuclear program last July, sees the threat of the Islamic State organization to the west and of the Taliban to the east as a Sunni trap ready to close on it.  --  Riyadh is convinced that its rival, whose allies are already dominant in Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, and half of Yemen, is engaged in a vast undertaking to weaken Sunnis and encircle the Arab world.  --  The resolution of the Iran nuclear dispute has only heightened the Saudi leaders' fears, persuaded as they are that Tehran, which has preserved its installations, will resume its march toward the bomb at the first opportunity."  --  Complicating their regional rivalry are their pretensions to religious authority:  "[B]oth . . . have pretensions with respect to global Islam.  --  Saudi Arabia because it is the 'protector' of the two holiest sites in Islam, Mecca and Medina, and therefore of the annual pilgrimage that draws nearly two million believers.  --  And Iran because its Islamist revolution, the first and the only one to have succeeded in creating a durable political system, has been accompanied since its onset in 1979 by appeals for a global uprising against the 'imperialism' of the United States, the principal support of the Al Saud regime." ...

Read more...
 

NEWS: Saudi executions & fallout guarantee further mayhem in Mideast

E-mail Print

On Saturday, in twelve different cities, Saudi Arabia carried out executions of forty-seven Muslims convicted of terrorism.  --  Forty-three were Sunnis and four were Shi'ites.  --  One of the Shi'ites executed, Nimr al-Nimra, was a prominent cleric whose principal crime seems to have been criticism of the brutal, obscurantist, intolerant, theocratic, yet faithfully Western-backed Saudi monarchy, an absolutist regime that in 2014 was the leading importer of military hardware in the world.  --  "The executions are Saudi Arabia's first in 2016.  --  At least 157 people were put to death last year, a big increase from the ninety people killed in 2014," Reuters reported.[1]  --  "[F]our prisons us[ed] firing squads and the others beheading."  --  It was the largest mass execution in Saudi Arabia since Jan. 9, 1980, when sixty-three were publicly beheaded in the aftermath of the Grand Mosque seizure of Nov. 29, 1979, but Saturday's executions were not carried out in public.  --  Saturday's executions "seemed mostly aimed at discouraging Saudis from jihadism," Angus McDowall said.  --  But many Shi'ites believe the four Shi'ites executed were innocent.  --  Their families "have vigorously denied they were involved in attacks and said they were only peaceful protesters against sectarian discrimination in the Sunni-ruled kingdom," McDowall said.  --  Iraq's Shi'ite leaders expressed outrage at the executions, with Ayatollah Sistani describing them as "an injustice and an aggression" and Moqtada al-Sadr calling them a "horrible attack," AFP reported Sunday.[2]  --  After the Saudi embassy in Tehran was stormed and partially burned by protesters, "Saudi Arabia cut diplomatic ties with Iran . . . and gave Iranian diplomats forty-eight hours to leave the kingdom," the New York Times reported Sunday.[3]  --  This despite the fact that "The Iranians did, however, appear to be taking steps to prevent the dispute from escalating further," Ben Hubbard and Thomas Erdbrink said.  --  "Forty Iranians were arrested in the anti-Saudi mayhem -- a sign that the authorities were trying to contain public outrage."  --  Michael Stephens, an analyst at the Royal United Services Institute, said the "very disturbing escalation" of tensions between Saudi Arabia and Iran guaranteed that "instability across the region is going to continue," particularly in Syria, whose civil conflict is also a proxy war between Saudi Arabia and Iran...

Read more...
 

NEWS: Unit's 14th loss points up US military's inadequate approach to suicide among vets

E-mail Print

The suicide on Dec. 9 of Tyler Schlagel, 29, a model "great Marine" from Longmont, Colorado, about 30 miles north of Denver, whom no one expected of suicidal thoughts, has deeply disturbed fellow soldiers and has highlighted once more a Kafkaesque aspect of the U.S. military's approach to suicide among veterans, Wednesday's New York Times reported.[1]  --  The U.S. military has no authority over former military personnel and the V.A. is not allowed to contact veterans until they seek help.  --  As a result, although the development of "suicide clusters" can put lives at risk, the military does nothing for units like the 2/7 (Second Battalion, Seventh Marine Regiment), which has seen fourteen suicides among its veterans returning from Afghanistan.  --  The Pentagon does not even have the capability accurately to assess the problem.  --  "'I don’t understand -- they should at least do something,' Madelyn Gould, an epidemiologist at Columbia University who helped create national guidelines on responding to suicide clusters, said in an interview."  --  COMMENT:  Strange to say, apart from the Times article Schlagel's death seems to have prompted little commentary.  --  A search of the Longmont Times-Call, the local paper owned by the MediaNews Group, turns up nothing.  --  The same holds true of The Denver Post, the Colorado Springs Gazette, the Boulder Daily Camera, The Pueblo Chieftain, the Grand Junction Daily Sentinel, the Fort Collins Coloradoan, the Loveland Reporter-Herald, The Durango Herald, and Cañon City Daily Record.  --  The New York Times posted a series entitled "Remembering a Marine" consisting of seven photos by Todd Heisler of Schlagel's funeral and burial in Longmont....

Read more...
 

TRANSLATION: France's state of emergency is no shield for democracy (G. Agamben)

E-mail Print

With the measured, Olympian gravity of the philosopher, well-known Italian political thinker Giorgio Agamben reminded readers of Le Monde (Paris) on Sunday that it is extremely naive to believe that the state of emergency that the government of President François Hollande is trying to write into the constitution of France's Fifth Republic is anything other than a preliminary to "a rapid and irreversible degradation of public institutions."[1]  --  A complete translation of Agamben's piece is posted below....

Read more...
 

NEWS: US forces in Libya revealed in bizarre incident

E-mail Print

A bizarre incident has revealed that the U.S. special forces are engaged in confronting ISIS in Libya.  --  On Monday 20-man special forces team arrived at an airbase in western Libya that is separated only by 10 miles of desert from an ISIS base at Ajaylat, outside the ancient port city of Sabratha.  --  They were asked to leave by fighters the London Guardian called "local commanders" but that the Pentagon called "a local militia."[1]  --  According to the Pentagon, they were seeking to meet "representatives of the Libyan National Army," evidently no easy task in a country consumed by civil war.  --  AFP said they had been "kicked out of Libya."[2]  --  But that expression perhaps exaggerated how confrontational the encounter had been.  --  A Libyan parliamentarian claimed that the special forces had been "disarmed," but the Libyan air force said on its Facebook page that they "[kept] their equipment with them" when they left.  --  In any case, Newsweek reported Friday that "Senior U.S. defense officials told NBC News that the incident did take place and that American forces have been “in and out of Libya” for 'some time now' to advise Libyan forces."[3]  --  COMMENT:  "What we have here is a failure to communicate," as Cool Hand Luke would have put it, a view encouraged by "one U.S. defense official" who, according to NBC News, "suggested the group was asked to leave because of a lack of communication between the base in Wattiya, where they landed, and the Libyan forces who would normally 'engage' with the American advisers."[4] ...

Last Updated on Saturday, 19 December 2015 01:50 Read more...
 

UFPPC statement: Why boost the appeal of ISIS's unholy quixotism?

E-mail Print

UNITED FOR PEACE OF PIERCE COUNTY

"We nonviolently oppose the reliance on unilateral military actions rather than cooperative diplomacy."

WHY BOOST THE APPEAL OF ISIS'S UNHOLY QUIXOTISM?

December 17, 2015

This week Iraqi forces took back some territory on the outskirts of Ramadi, according to a press release issued in Iraq on Tuesday.  One neighborhood and a glass factory were named.  This meager progress, it is said, "could advance government efforts to fully retake Ramadi" (Jerusalem Post, Dec. 18, 2015).

Read more...
 

TRANSLATION: Why half the French public doesn't bother to vote

E-mail Print

On Friday, Le Monde (Paris) reported on the responses of registered voters answering a request to explain why they chose not to vote.  --  The complete article is translated below.[1]  --  French abstention rates have risen steadily in recent years....

Read more...
 

TRANSLATION: Hollande’s proposal for constitutional reform is a political maneuver

E-mail Print

In the hours following the Paris attacks, President François Hollande decided to pursue as part of its response to the current crisis the amendment of France's already authoritarian constitution  --  An investigation by Mediapart, a French investigative journalism site, last week suggested that the move is principally a form of posturing.  --  "it puts the finishing touch on the incredible ultra-securitarian turn taken by François Hollande and his government since the Nov. 13 attacks," Lénaïg Bredoux said.  --  “It’s as if the Parti Socialiste does not want really want to see what it’s doing:  pursuing a policy that it would have violently denounced if it were out of power.”[1] ...

Read more...
 

ANALYSIS: Simplistic to see Paris attacks as consequence of systemic exclusion

E-mail Print

Seeing the Nov. 13 Paris attacks as a consequence of French colonialist attitudes only gets us so far and in fact is "dangerously reductive," a researcher at the University of Birmingham pointed out last week.[1]  --  "Fifty years after the end of the French empire, the situation has changed significantly," wrote, on his university's website, Berny Sèbe, an expert on the history of the Sahara, Franco-African relations since WWII, and comparative imperialisms who is the author of the book Heroic Imperialists in Africa (Manchester UP, 2013).  --  After all, "Arab countries, some of whom fought to the bitter end for their independence, have also suffered" from jihadism.  --  "The Algerian government, which emerged out of an eight-year struggle with France, battled with a decade of terror in the 1990s, which claimed between 100,000 and 200,000 lives."  --  And unlike decolonization movements, for which the notion of human rights was a source of inspiration, "jihadi groups reject wholesale the values inherited from the Enlightenment."  --  "By contrast, we are now witnessing through these attacks an attempt to challenge deliberately the core values of French (and Western) society."  --  Jihadists seek "the annihilation of the West and its values -- an objective which had never been even formulated by anti-colonial activists in the post-war period." ...

Last Updated on Thursday, 26 November 2015 13:45 Read more...
 

TRANSLATION: A review of intellectuals’ responses to the Paris attacks (Le Monde)

E-mail Print

On Saturday, Le Monde (Paris) offered brief summaries of what seven well-known intellectuals have been writing about the Paris attacks.[1]  --  Nicolas Truong also provided links to their recent pieces, all published in Le Monde....

Last Updated on Sunday, 22 November 2015 20:23 Read more...
 

TRANSLATION: France's preparedness for chemical and biological terrorist attacks

E-mail Print

On Nov. 19, an extraordinary warning of the possibility of a "chemical or bacteriological" terrorist attack in France was solemnly delivered by Prime Minister Manuel Valls to a packed National Assembly. Coming less than a week after a series of coordinated attacks took 130 lives and a day after an early-morning raid killed the Islamic State operative believed to have organized the Nov. 13 attacks and who seems to have been able to slip undetected into and out of the European Union's "Schengen Area," the announcement is being taken seriously be many commentators.  --  The president of the National Federation of French Firefighters took the occasion to review France's preparedness to respond to such an attack in the pages of Le Monde (Paris).[1]  --  A complete translation is posted below....

Read more...
 

TRANSLATION: After the Paris attacks, let's be realistic and demand the impossible

E-mail Print

Sophie Bessis, 60, is a well-known Jewish French-Tunisian journalist and historian.  --  Mohammed Harbi, 82, is a well-known Algerian academic who played an important role in the FLN during the Algerian War of Independence.  --  Both live in Paris, where on Tuesday they published in Le Monde an Op-Ed calling attention to links between the conjuncture that produced the November 13 attacks and the cynicism of French (and not only French) foreign policy in the Middle East.[1]  --  A complete translation is posted below....

Last Updated on Thursday, 19 November 2015 09:20 Read more...
 

ANALYSIS: The origins of Paris attacks lie in forty years of misguided French policies

E-mail Print

On Sunday, Jean-François Bayart, 65, the founder of the journals Politique africaine and Critique internationale, published in Libération (Paris) a thoroughgoing denunciation of several generations of political choices that have resulted, he thinks, in the crisis in which France finds itself today, and of which, he believes, the events of Nov. 13 are an unexpected result.[1]  --  A full translation is posted below.  --  Bayart blames not only French leaders who carried out these policies but the citizenry who have put them in power.  --  In comments, quite a few readers expressed contempt for Bayart and his thesis.  --  One wrote:  "This perplexing paper is a good illustration of the culture of self-flagellation and self-contempt that the French public has a right to expect from every great soul on the left." ...

Read more...
 

ESSAY: 'When death becomes a game, it's imperative to leave the arena' (Agnès Desarthe)

E-mail Print

In the hours after the Nov. 13 attacks in France, novelist Agnès Desarthe, 49, who lives in the Tenth Arrondissement of Paris, shaped her reflections on the challenges of living as a target of terrorism into an essay.  --  "Some calls arrived from abroad.  --  People talked to us, and in their voices, in their worry, we realized that this was happening to us.  --  To us.  --  But who are we?"[1] ...

Last Updated on Monday, 16 November 2015 06:57 Read more...
 

TRANSLATION: 'Third-generation jihadism' is trying to set off civil war in France (Gilles Kepel)

E-mail Print

There is surprisingly little being published in mainstream media by experts trying to explain what is going on in the minds of the jihadists who carried out the Nov. 13 attacks in Paris, and other attacks like them.  --  On Saturday, Gilles Kepel, who teaches at IEP in Paris and is one of the world's leading experts on the contemporary Arab world, published an interview in Le Monde (Paris) explaining his interpretation of the recent events.  --  Kepel believes that "al-Qaeda terrorism had mutated into third-generation jihadism.  --  Today we're paying the price of the blindness of our political élites."[1]  --  A full translation is posted below....

Read more...
 
More Articles...
  • «
  •  Start 
  •  Prev 
  •  1 
  •  2 
  •  3 
  •  4 
  •  5 
  •  6 
  •  7 
  •  8 
  •  9 
  •  10 
  •  Next 
  •  End 
  • »


Page 1 of 546

Save Net Neutrality!

MEETING SCHEDULE

United for Peace of Pierce County meets 7:00-8:30 p.m. on the first and third Thursdays of every month at First United Methodist Church in Tacoma (621 Tacoma Avenue South).

Search